Building a Workshop: Roof Trusses & Gables

Building a Workshop: Roof Trusses & Gables

Initially, my husband planned to order pre-made roof trusses, because that particular aspect of building was beyond his construction experience. However, our neighbor who works as a framer, showed us how to build this part of the workshop too. It turns out, building the roof wasn’t as daunting as we thought it would be. It just took plenty of lumber and accurate measurements to ensure the correct angles.

So we built our own roof trusses & gables!

Voila! My husband and neighbor built the trusses and gables on their own. They did it in such a way that the workshop has loft/attic space for storage. This will be nicer than storing all of our holiday decorations in a closet in the house or in the shed. The hardest part was calculating the angles and fitting each side together in the center. As it turns out, all you need to do this yourself are the right tools and some patience.

I still want to claim a corner for gardening supplies. However, we decided the shed on the property will become my gardening shed once the workshop is done. We moved all gardening tools and supplies into the shed. It works out better than I expected. There is plenty of space in there for both storage and maneuvering. My husband plans to replace the shelves in the shed and add a work bench I can use for potting plants and such.

Next week we are going to till, get dirt to add to the garden, and then start planting! So far we have herbs really thriving in containers. We had two nights dip below freezing early last week, so it looks like this coming week will be the optimal post-freeze planting time.

The workshop actually looks like a normal building now. It’s so exciting! More to come…

More about Wendy

Wendy is a Pagan city hippie living in the country. She is also a genealogist, writer, gamer, Pagan, and one of the authors of "Steampunk for Simpletons."A college town New Englander turned one-horse town Nebraskan, she raises a cup of Dunkies to life among cornfields and coyotes. She is still pleasantly surprised that amber waves of grain exist, and has declared the Midwestern prairies "wicked cool."

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